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GUIDE ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF SMOKELESS STOVE

By Naerls

If two pots are Uied, two or three holes on the stove are necessary; two holes for. cooking, the third for keeping food hot. If you plan to use more pots, you will need a stove with more than thre,e
holes. The stove can be straight or "L" shaped, depending on the size and shape of the kitchen. It can be high or low dependmg on the position the woman is used to.

Published: 04/03/2001

Size: 1.87MB

GUIDE ON THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF HOME MADE LEVEL

By Naerls

There are a number of field activities that require the determination
of levels of various points in the field. Where accurate and wide ranging levels are required, then instruments that can read graduated staff accurately will be required. Various types of engineering levels and theodelites with telescopic lenses have been developed for such purposes. These instruments are, however, pretty sophisticated and expensive. They are thus, virtually out ofreach of most ordinary field workers. So, there is the need to have simple instruments that can be used on the field particularly in setting up simple soil conservation structures
on farm lands. The home-made level is one such instrument that
has a wide application in the lay-out of contour lines for contour farming, contour strip cropping, terracing and the construction of storm drains. It can also be used in the construction of short ridges of irrigation channels in a small irrigation field. In addition, there can be many other applications of it in works that require the determination of relative levels of points within small areas of land.

Published: 04/03/2001

Size: 1.48MB

GUIDE TO THE CONSTRUCTION, USE AND OPERATION OF A HOME - MADE LEVEL

By Naerls

There are a number of field activieties that require the determination of levels of various points in the field. where accurate and wide ranging levels are required, then instruments that can read graduated staff accuratley will be required.

Published: 04/02/2001

Size: 1.22MB

GUIDE ON THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AN A-FRAME FOR THE LAYOUT OF FIELD SOIL CONSERVATION STRUCTURES

By Naerls

The engineers' level has been the favourite Instrument used for many years in the layout of soil conservation structures on the field, such as the setting out of contour lines for contour farming and strip cropping. Similarly, it has been used for setting out terraces
on the field. Even though a high degree of accuracy can be attained with the use of this instrument, a practically acceptable level of accuracy can also be obtained by the use of simpler instruments that are far less sophisticated than the ~ngineer' s level and which
can be handled by virtually anybody on the field for the layout of the soil conservation structures that are to be set along the contours of the land. One of such instruments is called the A-frame. It is so called because its - structure looks like the capital letter A. \his simple instrument can be constructed locally by any carpenter, or welder.

Published: 04/03/2001

Size: 971.79KB

The Production of Sweet Potatoes in Nigeria (Extension Guide No. 5, revised) 1996

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a starchy vegetable crop belonging to the family Convelvulacea, commonly known as the morning glory family. Many authorities share the view that the crop is indigenous to tropical America from where it was disseminated, first to the tropical Islands of the Pacific and
Northern New Zealand, and later to tropical Asia and Africa by Spanish and Portages explorers and traders. Today, sweet potato is widely grown as one of the important staple food crops in many of the tropical and sub-tropical world, and in the warmer areas of the temperate regions.

Published: 08/12/1996

Tags: sweet potatoes, vegetable crop, fertile soil, sandy loam, cocoyam

Size: 966.93KB

THE PRODUCTION OF COWPEAS IN THE NORTHERN STATES OF NIGERIA. Extension Guide No. 19

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Three promising varieties are currently under investigation for subsequent recommendation. These are Bulk 593, 588/2, 556/2 and are of semi-errect to
semi spreader type. Before firm recommendations are made Agricultural officer interested in trying these varieties (on production plots) may apply to the Senior Botanist, l.A.R., for seeds. You may however, use the most adaptable popular
variety in your area.

Published: 18/06/1999

Tags: cowpea production, site selection, spacing

Size: 1.65MB

GUIDE .QN SOYMILK AND MILK PRODUCTS

By Naerls

Soybean milk is a refreshing and nutritious drink. It is easy to prepare and costs very little when compared with animal milk. Drink the soybean milk with a little sugar or make enriched milk pap, tofu, cheese or yoghurt. Soybean milk can be substituted in any recipe that calls for milk. For maximum nutrition do not throw away the soybean milk residue. It could be used for soybean
cake, alele, soup or for flour in baking products or fortification of indigenous food. To improve the protein value of yam, rice, gari,
guinea com, millet, maize and acha, etc. Use soybean milk instead of water in the preparation of dishes made from these foods. Either use 100 percent soybean milk or try Yz soybean milk and Yz
water. Soybeans have one great advantage over many other protein sources in that no allergic properties have been associated with it so far. Therefore, it is recommended for infants who are allergic to cow milk e.g. children who are lactose intolerance, only soybean is suitable for them.

Published: 02/02/2001

Size: 0.99MB

GUIDE ON SOFT TOY MAKING

By Naerls

Toys in general can be defined as "a thing for play. This includes anything the child can play with irrespective of its size of shape e.g a whistle, rattles, tins, soft toy etc. Toys are very important in the
development of a child because they provide him with play things which is in itself educational.. This is so, because children learn through play. Among all toys soft toys occupies a rather unique place to a child because they are soft and less dangerous to play with. With the cost of every thing nowadays, mothers are faced with the problems of not being able to buy play things for their children especially soft toys which are more expensive than other toys. This guide intends to teach mothers how to make simple but attractive soft toys for their children using materials that are locally
available and cheap.

Published: 02/02/2001

Size: 1.00MB

Storing your Products Advisory Booklet No. 2 (1982) Yam Tubers & Dried Yam (Guide)

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

This booklet was first issue.d under the title "Operation Feed the Nation- Advisory Leaflet No.2". Storage of yam in tuber form for consumption is fairly easily achieved only for a period of about six months. The yam is living and natural changes in weight and quality cannot be entirely prevented. Sharply increasing losses are to be .expected after six months of storage. In order to achieve good storage of yams, the two most important factors to prevent are sprouting and rotting. The effects of sprouting on stored yam tubers are as follows :
1. It reduces the food reserves in yams by translocating carbohydrates from the tuber into sprouts for metabolic purposes.
2. It increases the rate of respiration of stored yams thereby increasing the rate of dry matter loss.
3. It causes an accelerated loss of moisture content of stored yams through the permeable surface of the sprouts which results in wilting of the tuber.
4. It causes substantial losses in weight in stored yam.
5. It makes the yam tuber become soft to touch (progressively from the bottom to the head) thereby leading to rotting.
6. It generally reduces the quality and palatability of the tuber which becomes fibrous and bitter especially at the head region where sprouting occurs.

Published: 17/06/1982

Tags: storage, produce, yam tuber, quality

Size: 2.21MB

Soft Toy Making (October 1999) Guide

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Toys in general can be defined as "a thing for play. This includes anything the child can play with irrespective of its size of shape e.g a whistle, rattles, tins, soft toy etc. Toys are very important in the development of a child because they provide him with play things which is in itself educational.. This is so, because children learn through play. Among all toys soft toys occupies a rather unique place to a child because they are soft and less dangerous to play with. With the cost of every thing nowadays, mothers are faced with the problems of not being able to buy play things for their children especially soft toys which are more expensive than other toys. This guide intends to teach mothers how to make simple but attractive soft toys for their children using materials that are locally
available and cheap.

Published: 18/10/1999

Tags: soft toy making, children, toys, fabric

Size: 1.09MB

GUIDE ON REMOVING STAINS

By Naerls

Stains are patches of colour different colour of fabirc from the that accidentally all on our clothing that require urgen and spical attention to remove tham.

Published: 02/02/2001

Size: 1.77MB

SAFE USE OF PESTICIDES. Extension Guide 53. 1999

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

The use of pesticides in Nigeria has increased steadily over the years. Apart from their uses around the home, they have become an indispensable part of our agriculture. If not properly handled, pesticides may constitute a danger to their users.

Published: 23/06/1999

Tags: pesticides, agriculture, safe use

Size: 1.53MB

RECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR GROUNDNUT PRODUCTION. EXTENSION RECOMMENDED PRACTICES No. 1

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

One of the most important industry rial cash and food crops in Nigeria is groundnut. It has a high oil ( 42 - 52 per cent) and protein (25 - 32 percent content. In Nigeria, it constitutes a principal source of protein and dietary oil for both subsistence farmers and urban dwellers. It also provides a significant source of cash income through sale of seed , dietary oil haulms. Groundnut has various uses: the kernels can be eaten fresh, boiled, dried or roasted. Most of the crop is crushed for oil and the residual cake is rich in protein and provides valuable human and livestock food . The haulms from which the poda have been picked are valuable livestock feed .

Published: 17/06/1998

Tags: groundnut production, haulms, kernels, protein content

Size: 2.28MB

PRODUCTION OF GINGER. EXTENSION GUIDE No. 7

By National Agricultural Extension And Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria

Ginger is native to South East Asia. It arrived Nigeria in 1927 and its cultivation started around Kwoi, Kubacha, Kafanchan and Kagoro of Southern Kaduna and around the neighbouring parts of Plateau and Nasarawa States. In recent
times, ginger cultivation has been introduced into the South Eastern and South-Western agricultural zones of Nigeria. The underground stem (rhizome) of the
ginger plant is the ginger of commerce. Traditionally, ginger is used in Nigeria for both medicinal and culinary (kitchen) purposes. The household uses of ginger.include: the preparation of puddings, soups, stew, pickles, as meat
tenderizer and for seasoning foods and meat as a spice.

Published: 21/04/2004

Tags: ginger production, rhizome, pickles, seasoning foods

Size: 1.98MB

GUIDE ON PRODUCTION OF MELON

By Naerls

·Egusi' melon (Citrulius Lanatus Kuntze) is an annual herbaceous cilimberwhich belong to the plant family.

I l does well in dry hot environment and does not do well
in humid or damp environment because of se1ious foliage disease
and pests leading to poor fiuit quality.
It is a crop that is usually used as a cover crop in that it
~overs the field early enough to reduce the cost of weeding

Published: 03/02/2001

Size: 767.05KB